ladies who should be playing mythical head bitches in charge | ASTRID BERGES-FRISBEY as ELAINE, the lily maid of astolat, who fell in love with lancelot du lac, and dying of unrequited love, floated down the thames to camelot.

The knight is young and quiet-eyed, and his hair is dark, flecked with auburn when the light falls from her windows just so. She leans forward, breath hovering in her throat, her fingers inches from the lines of his face. He is beautiful; a knight, she thinks. Oh, how she wished for a knight, how she wished to leave this tower, how she wished to be whisked away by a knight such as him. She had dreamed of a beautiful man to come and rescue her, and in her dreams he looked like this, exact. Be my knight, she wants to whisper, wants to imprint the words into his skin. The queen has her king; she has no need of you. Be my knight, she leans in close. Be mine.

(via mirroir)

Notes
590
Posted
3 weeks ago
writers-cube:


Morgause watched her sons ride south to her half-brother’s court. One by one they left: the rebellious, the ambitious, the loyal, the headstrong, and the innocent. They joked and smiled as they parted from her, giving her a hug or a quick kiss on the cheek and promising that they would be back one day as knights.
Morgause did not weep when they left. Tears were a weakness that a queen could ill afford.
Morgause did not wish them luck. She knew that there was no such thing in this world. 
Morgause did not say goodbye. It was not in her nature.
But Morgause went to her scrying bowl as soon as they were out of sight, and she reached deep within her for what little power she had left. She saw her sons’ fates play out in the water—she saw them rise to glory and pass into legend. And she saw every single one of them die at the edge of a sword.
Morgause watched her sons ride south. And they never came back—for what Camelot took, Camelot kept.

Shh… I’m having a lot of Orkney bros feels right now…

writers-cube:

Morgause watched her sons ride south to her half-brother’s court. One by one they left: the rebellious, the ambitious, the loyal, the headstrong, and the innocent. They joked and smiled as they parted from her, giving her a hug or a quick kiss on the cheek and promising that they would be back one day as knights.

Morgause did not weep when they left. Tears were a weakness that a queen could ill afford.

Morgause did not wish them luck. She knew that there was no such thing in this world. 

Morgause did not say goodbye. It was not in her nature.

But Morgause went to her scrying bowl as soon as they were out of sight, and she reached deep within her for what little power she had left. She saw her sons’ fates play out in the water—she saw them rise to glory and pass into legend. And she saw every single one of them die at the edge of a sword.

Morgause watched her sons ride south. And they never came back—for what Camelot took, Camelot kept.

Shh… I’m having a lot of Orkney bros feels right now…

Notes
45
Posted
2 months ago
rhaenysdayne:

a new avalon - mordred camlann

he’s serious, level headed and sensible. he’s capable of anything people throw at him and he loves a challenge. his ruthlessness is hidden though from all but those few people he cares about. he knows where he’s heading and he will stop at nothing to get there, no matter who he has to trample over.

rhaenysdayne:

a new avalon - mordred camlann

he’s serious, level headed and sensible. he’s capable of anything people throw at him and he loves a challenge. his ruthlessness is hidden though from all but those few people he cares about. he knows where he’s heading and he will stop at nothing to get there, no matter who he has to trample over.

Notes
12
Posted
2 months ago

“Every man carries the seed of his own death, and you will not be more than a man. You will have everything; you cannot have more…”                      ARTHURIAN LEGEND FANCAST:                     MADS MIKKELSEN - MERLIN
“Every man carries the seed of his own death, and you will not be more than a man. You will have everything; you cannot have more…” 


                     ARTHURIAN LEGEND FANCAST:
                     MADS MIKKELSEN - MERLIN

(via protectorofcamelot-deactivated2)

Notes
21
Posted
2 months ago
claudialala:

Morgana
Morgana, also known as Morgan le Fay, is a fairy queen and sorceress of Arthurian legend. She is one of three elder half-sisters to Arthur who are the daughters of Ygraine and Gorlois, the others being Morgause and Elaine. Morgana hated her half-brother Arthur nearly from the day he was born, and the legends are full of her attempts to bring his downfall. Like Vivian, she is said to have been a pupil of Merlin, and she is much associated with the magical island of Avalon.
Avalon, which means “Apple Trees,” is a magical paradise-type island or joyous land of the dead which is usually described as an island in the seas of the west, and Morgana may originally have been a sea Goddess. Avalon is also identified with Glastonbury, a great hill or tor in present-day Somerset England, which in modern Welsh is called Ynis Afallach, “Isle of Apples.” (Glastonbury Tor was once an island in a shallow marshy lake before the land was drained). An earlier name for it was Ynys Wydrin, or the “Isle of Glass” (though, oddly enough, the English word “Glastonbury” is not a translation), and glass is a substance associated in the Celtic mind with the Otherworld. Many legends speak of fantastic castles or towers made of glass, i.e. made from air or sea water, and Otherworld castles are frequently said to be islands in the sea or the sky, like Caer Arianrhod.
The Irish legend of Emain Ablach is a probable antecedent for Avalon. Emain Ablach (ablach means “apples” in Irish) was another magical Otherworld island in the sea off Scotland, which was said to be the home of Manannán mac Lir, the God of the sea.
Morgana may have roots in a Celtic sea Goddess. Her epithet “le Fay” translates to “the Fate” (or “the Fairy,” itself derived from “fate”), aligning her with a Goddess of the ending of cycles.
And beginnings. For though Morgana is forever trying to destroy Arthur, she also has powers of healing, and in the end she takes Arthur in to Avalon, to be healed of his wounds. According to prophecy, Arthur will wake, reborn, from an enchanted sleep to return to Britain in the time of its greatest need. Her predecessor Argante, called queen of Avalon in earlier legends, was also famed as a healer.
http://www.thaliatook.com/AMGG/morgana.php

claudialala:

Morgana

Morgana, also known as Morgan le Fay, is a fairy queen and sorceress of Arthurian legend. She is one of three elder half-sisters to Arthur who are the daughters of Ygraine and Gorlois, the others being Morgause and Elaine. Morgana hated her half-brother Arthur nearly from the day he was born, and the legends are full of her attempts to bring his downfall. Like Vivian, she is said to have been a pupil of Merlin, and she is much associated with the magical island of Avalon.

Avalon, which means “Apple Trees,” is a magical paradise-type island or joyous land of the dead which is usually described as an island in the seas of the west, and Morgana may originally have been a sea Goddess. Avalon is also identified with Glastonbury, a great hill or tor in present-day Somerset England, which in modern Welsh is called Ynis Afallach, “Isle of Apples.” (Glastonbury Tor was once an island in a shallow marshy lake before the land was drained). An earlier name for it was Ynys Wydrin, or the “Isle of Glass” (though, oddly enough, the English word “Glastonbury” is not a translation), and glass is a substance associated in the Celtic mind with the Otherworld. Many legends speak of fantastic castles or towers made of glass, i.e. made from air or sea water, and Otherworld castles are frequently said to be islands in the sea or the sky, like Caer Arianrhod.

The Irish legend of Emain Ablach is a probable antecedent for Avalon. Emain Ablach (ablach means “apples” in Irish) was another magical Otherworld island in the sea off Scotland, which was said to be the home of Manannán mac Lir, the God of the sea.

Morgana may have roots in a Celtic sea Goddess. Her epithet “le Fay” translates to “the Fate” (or “the Fairy,” itself derived from “fate”), aligning her with a Goddess of the ending of cycles.

And beginnings. For though Morgana is forever trying to destroy Arthur, she also has powers of healing, and in the end she takes Arthur in to Avalon, to be healed of his wounds. According to prophecy, Arthur will wake, reborn, from an enchanted sleep to return to Britain in the time of its greatest need. Her predecessor Argante, called queen of Avalon in earlier legends, was also famed as a healer.

http://www.thaliatook.com/AMGG/morgana.php

Notes
14
Posted
2 months ago

themonsterkeeper:

MYTHOLOGY MEME: One of Two Mythological Objects

There are two legendary swords associated with King Arthur, though people tend to mix them up. Excalibur was the sword given to Arthur by the Lady of the Lake after he’d already become king; the Sword in the Stone was what made him king.

The story goes that Arthur was taken from his mother, Igraine, and raised in secret by a loyal knight, Sir Ector, and his son, Sir Kay. Arthur’s adopted family loved him, but either did not know that he was the heir to the throne or didn’t tell him for his own safety.

Merlin, a powerful sorcerer, planted the king’s sword in a stone upon his death, and offered the throne to any man who could pull out the sword. Men came from all over Britain to try the sword, but all failed - until Arthur’s brother Kay forgot his sword at home and asked Arthur to run and fetch it. Arthur passed the massive boulder on his way home and decided to take the sword stuck in it for his brother. Thus, unknowing and innocent, Arthur pulled the sword from the stone and claimed his rightful place as high king of Britain.

Arthurian legend often presents innocence as a virtue. Chastity is prized, and only the most innocent and purest of knights can drink from the Holy Grail. The sword-in-the-stone incident is an important but often overlooked example of this obsession with purity: Only the man who does not want to be king should be allowed to rule.

(Source: mythandrists)

Notes
325
Posted
2 months ago

trinity71:

The Greatest Love Stories (2/?)

Ichabbie as Lancelot & Guinevere

The tragic love story of Sir Lancelot and Queen Guinevere is probably one of the best-known stories of Arthurian Legend. Lancelot fell in love with Queen Guinevere, King Arthur’s wife. Their love grew slowly, as Guinevere kept Lancelot away from her. Eventually, however, her love and passion overpowered her and the pair became lovers. One night, Sir Agravain and Sir Modred, King Arthur’s nephew, led a band of 12 knights to Guinevere’s chamber where they burst in upon the lovers. Discovered, Sir Lancelot made a fighting escape, but poor Guinevere was not so lucky. She was seized and condemned to burn to death for her adultery. Fear not. Sir Lancelot returned several days later to rescue his beloved Guinevere from the fire. This whole sad affair divided the Knights of the Round Table and weakened Arthur’s kingdom. Poor Lancelot ended his days as a lowly hermit and Guinevere became a nun at Amesbury where she died.

Notes
72
Posted
2 months ago
shakespeareandpunk:

R E X    Q U O N D A M    R E X Q U E    F U T U R U S
"He passes to be King among the dead,And after healing of his grievous woundHe comes again; but—if he come no more—O me, be yon dark Queens in yon black boat,Who shrieked and wailed, the three whereat we gazedOn that high day, when, clothed with living light,They stood before his throne in silence, friendsOf Arthur, who should help him at his need?”   Then from the dawn it seemed there came, but faintAs from beyond the limit of the world,Like the last echo born of a great cry,Sounds, as if some fair city were one voiceAround a king returning from his wars.

shakespeareandpunk:

R E X    Q U O N D A M    R E X Q U E    F U T U R U S

"He passes to be King among the dead,
And after healing of his grievous wound
He comes again; but—if he come no more—
O me, be yon dark Queens in yon black boat,
Who shrieked and wailed, the three whereat we gazed
On that high day, when, clothed with living light,
They stood before his throne in silence, friends
Of Arthur, who should help him at his need?”

   Then from the dawn it seemed there came, but faint
As from beyond the limit of the world,
Like the last echo born of a great cry,
Sounds, as if some fair city were one voice
Around a king returning from his wars.

Notes
280
Posted
2 months ago

sleepystoryteller:

The legend of Tristan and Isolde is an influential romance and tragedy, retold in numerous sources with as many variations. The tragic story of the adulterous love between the Cornish knight Tristan (Tristram) and the Irish princess Isolde (Iseult, Yseut, etc.), the narrative predates and most likely influenced the Arthurian romance of Lancelot and Guinevere, and has had a substantial impact on Western art and literature since it first appeared in the 12th century. While the details of the story differ from one author to another, the overall plot structure remains much the same.

(Source: mrsbeefheart, via mirroir)

Notes
1042
Posted
3 months ago
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